History History

STEP BACK IN TIME BEFORE DOMESTIC APPLIANCES


EXPERIENCE A GENUINE OLD-TIME RURAL ATMOSPHERE

 

The heart of the museum comprises an original farmstead dating back to the 19th century. There are over 20 buildings and around 1,400 catalogued original artefacts. Riuttala was chosen to represent the Finnish countryside and the rural way of life at the Paris World Exhibition in 1900.

The first reference to Riuttala appeared on a map, dating back to 1657, of the fiefs held by Count Peter Brahe. The first farm-owner known by name was Tuomas Paavonpoika Maaranen in the late 17th century. He sold the farm to Sylvester Tiitinen in the early 18th century. The ownership remained in the same family line, and from 1820 to 1975 it was passed from father to son for generations within the Ikäheimo family.

All of the present buildings of the farmstead were built during the ownership of the Ikäheimo family. The main farmhouse was completed in 1852.

The other dwelling house was originally used only in summer and for accommodating guests. It was moved to its present site from the old farmyard.

The farmstead buildings include Finland's biggest grain-drying barn, an exceptionally large grain storehouse from the slash-and-burn era, a windmill, a morgue shed and a smoke sauna. Old farm tools are on display in the authentic places where they were used in the past.

Ever since the 1760s, large numbers of cattle have been raised at Riuttala. Fish were caught from the nearby Lake Riuttanen to supplement the food from farming. The seine shed was built in the early 1870s and the farm had three seines, 43 gill nets and 55 fyke nets.

Riuttala has been in the ownership of the Riuttala Foundation for the Conservation of Peasant Culture and Heritage since 1975.

 

A hearty welcome awaits you at Riuttala!

 

RIUTTALA FOUNDATION FOR THE CONSERVATION OF PEASANT CULTURE AND HERITAGE